Art and Culture

bioterrorism

The following poem is from the collection "War," by Sarwat Rumi, released in 2005. Rumi is a bilingual Bengali American Muslim in Chicago. To order a chapbook, email here.

i remember
the picture in the paper
quite vividly:     bosnia 1992.
a woman hanging by her neck     from a tree.
a maddening end to two lives
hers     and the child she carried
conceived of rape:
casualties
of the oldest form of bioterrorism

red clay women

The following poem is from the collection "War," by Sarwat Rumi, released in 2005. Rumi is a bilingual Bengali American Muslim in Chicago. To order a chapbook, email here.

taught     to be a father's daughter.
a brother's sister.    a husband's wife.
taught     the roles that defined honor
in peacetime.

fathers, brothers, husbands
should have known better than to shape us this way

Nothing Will Defeat The Spirit of This Land: Posters on the War in Viet Nam

Exhibition Critiques U.S. War Policies

This is a lightly-edited version of the exhibition's press release

The Asian & Pacific Islander Coalition Against War (APICAW) in conjunction with the Asian Resource Gallery and the All Of Us Or None archival collection of political posters is proud to present "Nothing Will Defeat the Spirit of This Land: Posters on the War in Viet Nam." APICAW is a Bay Area coalition of API individuals and organizations that believes true peace and security can only come through global justice.

Coalition Of Local Apa Artists Announces Production Of Missed Sigh Gone

Boston, MA – A coalition of local Asian Pacific American (APA) artists announced upcoming production of Missed Sigh Gone, a response to the racist and misogynistic musical Miss Saigon. The show will take place 7pm, Thursday, February 24 at the Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center, 85 West Newton St. in Boston. Admission is $10; students and seniors are $5.

Exhibit on Forgotten Korean War Calls out for Peace

On the last weekend in January, several hundred people attended the moving opening of “Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” a new exhibit on the continuing impact of the Korean War on the Korean American community. The multi-media exhibit of video, installation, and performance art by Korean and Korean American artists made a powerful statement about war’s expansive and penetrating impact, not only on combatants, but also on civilians, families, communities, succeeding generations and nations.

AmeriKa

by Jason Jaewan Lee and Brian Viernez
Copyright "the people" April 2002

          
           i learned how you stripped one man
           of his dignity
           labeled him a spy
           with your devilish white lies

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