History

History of the Red Guard Party

By Former Members

circa 1972

This article was written and submitted to Getting Together by a few former members of the Red Guard Party and is not intended to represent the entire membership.

The Red Guard Party was founded in San Francisco's Chinatown in February of 1969. Our membership was primarily composed of American-born Chinese youth. Due to the incorrectness of our political line, our organizational structure and our method of work, we disbanded in July of 1971.

Aloha 'Ãina (Love of the Land): The Struggle for Land and Power in Hawai'i

from East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 Spring/Summer (1982) Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

by Tracy Takano

This image of foreigners became a reality, and today native Hawai'ians and other local people–the people of Hawai'i from Asia, Puerto Rico and Portugal first brought over as contract laborers by the plantation owners–are locked into a fight with the graspers for every beach, valley and piece of land in Hawai'i.

Wes Senzaki

from East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 (1982)

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

Philip Vera Cruz

from East Wind Magazine (1982) Vol. 1 No. 1

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

I wanted to go to college but my family did not have the money. To accomplish my goal, I had two alternatives, I could come to the United States or I could stay in the Philippines and teach in Mindanao where I could earn some money to go to college. I took the alternative of coming here. They taught us in school about the many opportunities in the U.S. and of equality in the U.S. All that kind of talk gives you hope.

Happy Lim

from East Wind Magazine (1982) Vol. 1 No. 1

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

Time has slipped by - 40 or 50 years in the blink of an eye. The U.S. society of the '30s was one of economic depression. Confronted by this hard fact and living in a grey social atmosphere, struggling to make a livelihood, I became tempered. Some of my childish dreams were shattered, but a vision of the future lent an incandescence to the era.

Lori Leong

from East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 (1982)

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

I got involved in the late '60s and early'70s when I was a freshman in college.

May Chen

East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 (1982)

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

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