Wes Senzaki

from East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 (1982)

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

Happy Lim

from East Wind Magazine (1982) Vol. 1 No. 1

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

Time has slipped by - 40 or 50 years in the blink of an eye. The U.S. society of the '30s was one of economic depression. Confronted by this hard fact and living in a grey social atmosphere, struggling to make a livelihood, I became tempered. Some of my childish dreams were shattered, but a vision of the future lent an incandescence to the era.

May Chen

East Wind Magazine Vol. 1 No. 1 (1982)

Subheadings were added to the original publication to make this more readable on the web.

Power-One Update

taken from Chinese Progressive Association newsletter

In mid-May, several Power-One workers came up to Chinese Progressive Association to ask for help. Power-One is a manufacturing plant located in Allston, MA. They are the sixth largest power conversion equipment manufacturer in the world with factories in Europe, Asia and North America.

GAME OVER FOR HOLIDAY BOWL?

By Scott Kurashige
from Gidra Summer 2001
photos: Brian Minami

 

Until its doors closed last May, Crenshaw's Holiday Bowl constantly drew together Angelenos of all races, ages and classes. It was a unique social space unlike any other in Los Angeles, or for that matter, the world. While its modernist "Googie" architecture alone makes it worthy of landmark status.

BRANDEIS STUDENTS RALLY AFTER ASIAN AND WOMEN HATE ACTS

Thanks to Doug Brugge
taken from Brandeis student press release

Concerned students staged a noon rally in front of the Usdan Student Center, spurred by recent harassment targeting Asian- American women on Brandeis University campus. The rally provided a safe space for students voices to be heard and solidarity in the fight against all forms of intolerance and discrimination.

WHAT I DO KNOW

by Marilyn Hamano Quan

Asian Americans the Movement and the Moment accurately reflects the movement of my generation to re-define our identity, culture, and communities as Asian peoples in the US. It beautifully and uniquely records the contributions of the cultural artists. It shows how we fought for ethnic studies, built social service programs, and united communities to fight for seemingly impossible demands; like redress/reparations for Japanese Americans. We organized ethnically: as Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Pilipinos, and Vietnamese and as Asian Americans.

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