Hiroshima-Nagasaki

From N.Y. Asian Coalition Newsletter vol. 1 no. 2 Sept ’72 (typos as in original text) 

 
On the 27th anniversary of Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Asian Coalition presented two "From Hiroshima-Nagasaki to Indochina to the Asian-American Experience" teach-ins: one on July 30 at the Japanese Christian Church, specifically for the Japanese community; the other on August 6 at Rutgers Community Center, for a wider Asian audience. Both teach-ins had 5 presentations: Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese. Each speaker linked struggles of their own people to the massacre of the Japanese in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and to US aggression in Vietnam. Along with the speeches was shown a new film from Vietnam, "Vietnam for the Vietnamese", and presentation by Asian Tactical Theatre on Asian identity and stereotyping in America.
 
Min Matsuda, the Japanese speaker, spoke about the effects of the A-bomb. 
Although 300,000 men, women, and children died instantly, there were countless numbers of survivors, Besides the usual burning and miaming, the ionizing radiation of the bomb has caused leukemia, cancer, A-bomb cataracts, mental retardation, anemia, and premature aging. But perhaps what is worse is their rejection by the rest of the Japanese society. Moreover, these effects have been passed on to next generation.
 
The effects of the A-bomb on the victims have caused them to surfer greatly in areas of job and educational opportunities and marriage. These people have found that because of their condition, there is a great need for than to have plenty of rest, thereby hindering the types of jobs they could have. There was also the need for spending large part of their income on medical care, preventing them from being able to support a family.
 
Hiroshima-Nagasaki is only one example of the racist nature of American government’s complete disregard for human life, especially that of Third World people. US imperialism is now causing even worse destruction in Indochina than at Hiroshima-Nagasaki 27 years ago. Here in America, Asians have also suffered from that same racist policy since the day the first immigrants had come.
 
The theme for the teach-ins was unity. Asians must unite, not only with each other, but with all Third World, poor and working people, so that there will be no more Hiroshimas and no more Vietnams.