Asian American Reality

Asian American Reality Conference Poster

A major East Coast Asian American conference in December, 1970

(Text of the back of flyer)

America see its Asian population as being exotic representatives of the quiet, hard-working, diligent, Asian countries we studied in our elementary school class. We have no crime, no unemployment, no broken families, no social problems. We go through school and become businessmen, physicists, chemists, doctors, and engineers. In short, all is milk and honey. But we know better...
Being diligent and hard-working didn't keep over 100,000 Japanese-Americans out of the concentration camps. Building family and new life in a new country can be rough if you aren't allowed to bring your wife as happened to Filipino and Chinese immigrants. Being hard-working didn't prevent the formation of Chinatown ghettoes. The health department doesn't know we're dying from TB. Chinatown has New York City's highest tuberculosis rate. Our much-praised community organizations have taken to lining their own pockets. We have a crime problem but then we always did with mugging, robberies and murder being added to the list of gambling, prostitution and extortion. But at least we have our jobs as laundrymen, waiters, migrant farm workers or gardeners--low paying and degrading though they be. Were stoic but not stoic enough to prevent a drug problem or the fact that the Chinese have a suicide rate three times the national average. Our ghettoes rank with Watts and Harlem for human degradation and exploitation. A handful escape to an ambiguous and anomic white suburbia where we watch oar children learn to hate the color of their skin and the slant of their eyes. We watch helplessly as they lose all positive knowledge of their people and heritage. Something is wrong, the milk has soured and the honey tastes bitter.
Many of us have long sensed that something is awry. "America the beautiful" in looking ugly. But we never had anyone to confirm our    doubts . Hopefully this conference will shed light on these social and economic problems and offer possible solutions. All of us: students, workers, professionals, street people, scholars, and community workers must unite and take an effective role in determination of a better future for our people.
The conference is set to start at 10AM, SHARP, on Saturday. Registration will begin at 9:30Am at MacMillan Hall. For further information call telephone numbers on the front, watch out for notices on campus and in newspapers.

Printed with donated labor by 218 East 6th Street Collective.