THE ASIAN- AMERICAN CONFERENCE AT YALE

from NYC student publication, Harmony, 1970               

 

       Perhaps the student below reflected best the general mood of the students that attended the Asian-American Conference at Yale University:    

     “The white man's always studying all these other ethnic groups. It's about time they study themselves: see the disease of their minds. You know - the racism. Like they send groups to the ghettos, and, say the President's Commission report on Urban Problems in the Black Community and the Asian Community, like we're some kind of sub­culture that they have to study to see what is wrong with us. You know, it's about time we should point the finger and say, 'Hey-look Mister Charlie, it's about time you look at yourself!' It's really sad, I think, that the white man is screwing us over. … It's fine that we are getting together somewhat right now. How I feel is that we're still on the whole a very passive attitude in this room right now - that we're doing our own thing in our own school. But, there lacks that unity - that cohesiveness - which we need. … We should constantly keep in contact with each other … to continue this kind of communication because a conference like this once in a while is not enough."


     Students arrived from Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Conn., and Rhode Island to attend the Asian-American Conference which was held on Oct. 17. The conference was held to l)review the situation of Asian students on the campuses 2)discuss Asian courses in the colleges 3)discuss possibilities of an east coast news publication for the Asian students. Other issues presented for discussion was on an Asian identity and the relationship of the Asian movement to that of the Third World Coalition. Of course, the matter of lack of unity among Asian students and the lack of activities that each Asian student club can sponsor was brought up. CSC's president was on hand to represent its thirteen colleges of New York City. The participants at the Asian-American Conference came from the following colleges: Amherst, Barnard, Brandeis, Brown, CCNY, Columbia, Hunter, NYU, Princeton, Rutgers, Seton Hall, Smith, Southern Conn. State College, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stevens, Vassar, and Yale.

     A noteworthy question a student asked during the meeting, which reflects on all of us is - Are you going to commit yourself for yourself?


By A STAFF CORRESPONDANT